Bodacious Books

For the love of books
moma:

In honor of our new Picasso e-book, Design Observer shares a rarely-told Picasso story.

[Pablo Picasso. Maya in a Sailor Suit. 1938]

moma:

In honor of our new Picasso e-book, Design Observer shares a rarely-told Picasso story.

[Pablo Picasso. Maya in a Sailor Suit. 1938]

nprfreshair:

Today Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell. Corrigan says the novel gives readers “the chance to step out of time for a while and into a world richer and stranger than most of us could imagine.” 
She encourages readers to try The Bone Clocks, even if fantasy fiction isn’t your cup of tea: 

"David Mitchell is one of those writers I’d follow anywhere—even deep into (what is for me) the often-exasperating genre of fantasy fiction.  I don’t naturally gravitate to tales about alternative universes, wormholes, or tribbles; but, there are always exceptions and if Mitchell feels like trying out a semi-futuristic vehicle about immortal soul stealers, I’m willing to take a deep breath, step aboard, and say, in the words of Rod Serling: “Next stop, the Twilight Zone.” 
As in Cloud Atlas and some of his lesser-known novels, Mitchell’s new book, called The Bone Clocks, is elaborately constructed, jumping around in time and narrative perspective.  A friend of mine, who’s also a Mitchell enthusiast, rightly says that his novels are “postmodernist without all the pretentious metaphysics.”  What my friend means is that Mitchell’s technical wizardry is there, not for show, but in service to his themes and characters—he’s a deeply compassionate writer.   In fact, despite its experimental edge, the main reason to read The Bone Clocks is an old-fashioned one:  the draw of a charismatic character named Holly Sykes.”

nprfreshair:

Today Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell. Corrigan says the novel gives readers “the chance to step out of time for a while and into a world richer and stranger than most of us could imagine.” 

She encourages readers to try The Bone Clocks, even if fantasy fiction isn’t your cup of tea: 

"David Mitchell is one of those writers I’d follow anywhere—even deep into (what is for me) the often-exasperating genre of fantasy fiction.  I don’t naturally gravitate to tales about alternative universes, wormholes, or tribbles; but, there are always exceptions and if Mitchell feels like trying out a semi-futuristic vehicle about immortal soul stealers, I’m willing to take a deep breath, step aboard, and say, in the words of Rod Serling: “Next stop, the Twilight Zone.” 

As in Cloud Atlas and some of his lesser-known novels, Mitchell’s new book, called The Bone Clocks, is elaborately constructed, jumping around in time and narrative perspective.  A friend of mine, who’s also a Mitchell enthusiast, rightly says that his novels are “postmodernist without all the pretentious metaphysics.”  What my friend means is that Mitchell’s technical wizardry is there, not for show, but in service to his themes and characters—he’s a deeply compassionate writer.   In fact, despite its experimental edge, the main reason to read The Bone Clocks is an old-fashioned one:  the draw of a charismatic character named Holly Sykes.”

7 Ways J.K. Rowling Changed Childhood For A Whole Generation

(Source: huffpostbooks, via huffingtonpost)

Rainbow Rowell Does Romance With a Subversive (Read: Realistic) Twist

Putting Landline on my To-Read list.  I really enjoyed Fangirl - ended up reading Eleanor & Park as a result; enjoyed that one, too.  Love her writing style and character development!

melindakburns:

I’m not sure how I feel about this.

A lot of the books I really enjoy are being made into movies, which can be great, but at the same time, can be totally heart breaking.  I’ve watched awesome books like World War Z become but a shell of their book.  But people love them. 

Even here, with this story.  In the book, the boy is a child. He is twelve years old!  He is burdened with keeping the memories of the community. All the memories, the good and the painful.  In a world of sameness, Jonas is trying to form real relationships with people.  It is so much deeper than this trailer implies, with a boy who is almost an adult, trying to rock the world with his radical ideas. 

Don’t get me wrong, this is not always the case.  Some books are awesome when they are made into movies.  I have a hard time differentiating between the movie version and the book when this happens, because it seems as if they flow together so seamlessly, as if they are one and the same. 

While some people may go back to read the books afterward, many will not, believing that the on screen adaption is good enough, not knowing that they are missing so much. 

I fear for the future, where people would rather watch literature than read it. 

Looking forward to reading the book!