Bodacious Books

For the love of books

Rainbow Rowell Does Romance With a Subversive (Read: Realistic) Twist

Putting Landline on my To-Read list.  I really enjoyed Fangirl - ended up reading Eleanor & Park as a result; enjoyed that one, too.  Love her writing style and character development!

melindakburns:

I’m not sure how I feel about this.

A lot of the books I really enjoy are being made into movies, which can be great, but at the same time, can be totally heart breaking.  I’ve watched awesome books like World War Z become but a shell of their book.  But people love them. 

Even here, with this story.  In the book, the boy is a child. He is twelve years old!  He is burdened with keeping the memories of the community. All the memories, the good and the painful.  In a world of sameness, Jonas is trying to form real relationships with people.  It is so much deeper than this trailer implies, with a boy who is almost an adult, trying to rock the world with his radical ideas. 

Don’t get me wrong, this is not always the case.  Some books are awesome when they are made into movies.  I have a hard time differentiating between the movie version and the book when this happens, because it seems as if they flow together so seamlessly, as if they are one and the same. 

While some people may go back to read the books afterward, many will not, believing that the on screen adaption is good enough, not knowing that they are missing so much. 

I fear for the future, where people would rather watch literature than read it. 

Looking forward to reading the book!

10 Things to Know About Anne Frank's The Diary of a Young Girl

"Despite everything, I believe that people are really good at heart."

- Anne Frank

newyorker:

“The Fault in Our Stars,” based on John Green’s novel, is in theatres today. Read Margaret Talbot’s piece on how the author built an ardent army of fans: http://nyr.kr/1iMf1MN

newyorker:

“The Fault in Our Stars,” based on John Green’s novel, is in theatres today. Read Margaret Talbot’s piece on how the author built an ardent army of fans: http://nyr.kr/1iMf1MN

(Source: newyorker.com)

The Politics of Fiction

Listening to stories widens the imagination; telling them lets us leap over cultural walls, embrace different experiences, feel what others feel. Elif Shafak builds on this simple idea to argue that fiction can overcome identity politics.